From fundamental research to pilot scale - the material that can replace polystyrene foam
The cellulose material Papira is a bio-based and recyclable replacement for fossil-based foam materials such as polystyrene, which in everyday speech is called styrofoam. What started as fundamental research within the research center WWSC has been further developed by Stora Enso, which was recently able to inaugurate a pilot facility.
Bakgrund Papira-event
Professor Lars Wågberg tells kth.se about the first steps and the research that led to a foam material, by then made of nanocellulose. The first steps were taken as a doctoral thesis within the research center Wallenberg Wood Science Center and in 2012, doctoral student Nicholas Cervin was able to present his thesis. – It turned out to work very well and we then worked hard to understand the basic parameters that control the stability of water-based foams, says Lars Wågberg to kth.se. The first promising results led Lars Wågberg and his colleagues to contact Cellutech, now part of Stora Enso. Since then, a lot of development has taken place and the material is now made of cellulose fibers. Recently, Stora Enso inaugurated its pilot plant for Papira, which is located at Stora Enso’s plant in Fors. What began as fundamental research has thus taken another major step towards contributing to a fossil-free world. Read the full article at kth.se

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